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February 2016 Newsletter

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 03 2016

 

February 2016 Update - Roth IRA Rules & Married Filing Jointly vs Separately

Reacquainting Yourself With The Roth IRA

If you’ve looked into retirement planning, you’ve probably heard about the Roth IRA. Maybe in the past you decided against one of these arrangements, or perhaps you just decided to sleep on it. Whatever the case may be, now’s a good time to reacquaint yourself with the Roth IRA and its potential benefits, because you have until April 18, 2016, to make a 2015 Roth IRA contribution.

Free withdrawals

With a Roth IRA, you give up the deductibility of contributions for the freedom to make tax-free qualified withdrawals. This differs from a traditional IRA, where contributions may be deductible and earnings grow on a tax-deferred basis, but withdrawals (less any prorated nondeductible contributions) are subject to ordinary income taxes — plus a 10% penalty if you’re under age 59½ at the time of the distribution.

With a Roth IRA, you can withdraw your contributions tax-free and penalty-free anytime. Withdrawals of account earnings (considered made only after all your contributions are withdrawn) are tax-free if you make them after you’ve had the Roth IRA for five years and you’re age 59½ or older. Earnings withdrawn before this time are subject to ordinary income taxes, as well as a 10% penalty (with certain exceptions) if withdrawn before you are age 59½.

On the plus side, you can leave funds in your Roth IRA as long as you want. This differs from the required minimum distributions starting after age 70½ for traditional IRAs.

Limited contributions

For 2016, the annual Roth IRA contribution limit is $5,500 ($6,500 for taxpayers age 50 or older), reduced by any contributions made to traditional IRAs. Your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) may also affect your ability to contribute, however.

In 2016, the contribution limit phases out for married couples filing jointly with MAGIs between $184,000 and $194,000. The 2016 phaseout range for single and head-of-household filers is $117,000 to $132,000.

Conversion question

Regardless of MAGI, anyone may convert a traditional IRA into a Roth to turn future tax-deferred potential growth into tax-free potential growth. From an income tax perspective, whether a conversion makes sense depends on whether you’re better off paying tax now or later.

When you do a Roth conversion, you have to pay taxes on the amount you convert. So if you expect your tax rate to be higher in retirement than it is now, converting to a Roth may be advantageous — provided you can afford to pay the tax using funds from outside an IRA. If you expect your tax rate to be lower in retirement, however, it may make more sense to leave your savings in a traditional IRA or employer-sponsored plan.

Retirement radar

Roth IRAs have become a fundamental part of retirement planning. Even if you’re not ready for one just yet, be sure to keep the idea of opening one on your radar.

Married Filers, The Choice Is Yours

Some married couples assume they have to file their tax returns jointly. Others may know they have a choice but not want to rock the boat by filing separately. The truth is that there’s no harm in at least considering your options every year.

Granted, married taxpayers who file jointly can take advantage of certain credits not available to separate filers. They’re also more likely to be able to make deductible IRA contributions and less likely to be subject to the alternative minimum tax.

But there are circumstances under which filing separately may be a good idea. For example, filing separately can save tax when one spouse’s income is much higher than the others, and the spouse with lower income has miscellaneous itemized deductions exceeding 2% of his or her adjusted gross income (AGI) or medical expenses exceeding 10% of his or her AGI — but jointly the couple’s expenses wouldn’t exceed the applicable floor for their joint AGI. However, in community property states, income and expenses generally must be split equally unless they’re attributable to separate funds.

Many factors play into the joint vs. separate filing decision. If you’re interested in learning more, please give us a call.

 

January 2016 Newsletter

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 07 2016

 

January 2016 Update - Preventing Tax-related Identity Theft & Simplifying Your Financial Life

How You Can Help Prevent Tax-related Identity Theft

Tax-related fraud isn’t a new crime, but tax preparation software, e-filing and increased availability of personal data have made tax-related identity theft increasingly easy to perpetrate. The IRS is taking steps to reduce such fraud, but taxpayers must play their part, too.

How they do it

Criminals perpetrate tax identity theft by using stolen Social Security numbers and other personal information to file tax returns in their victims’ names. Naturally, the fake returns claim that the filer is owed a refund — and the bigger, the better.

To ensure they’re a step ahead of taxpayers filing legitimate returns and employers submitting W-2 and 1099 forms, the thieves file early in the tax season. They usually request that refunds be made to debit cards, which are hard for the IRS to trace once they’re distributed.

IRS takes action

The increasing rate of tax-related fraud — not to mention the well-publicized 2015 IRS data breach — has spurred government agencies and private sector businesses to act. This past June, a coalition made up of the IRS, state tax administrators, tax preparation services and payroll and tax product processors announced a new program with five initiatives:

1. Taxpayer identification. Coalition members will review transmission data such as Internet Protocol numbers.

2. Fraud identification. Members will share fraud leads and aggregated tax return information.

3. Information assessment. The Refund Fraud Information Sharing and Assessment Center will help public and private sector members share information.

4. Cybersecurity framework. Members will be required to adopt the National Institute of Standards and Technology cybersecurity framework.

5. Taxpayer awareness and communication. Members will increase efforts to inform the public about identity theft and protecting personal data.

Your role in preventing fraud

But the IRS and tax preparation professionals can’t fight fraud without your help. Be sure to keep your Social Security card secure, and if businesses (including financial institutions and medical providers) request your Social Security number, ensure they need it for a legitimate purpose and have taken precautions to keep your data safe. Also regularly review your credit report. You can obtain free copies from all three credit bureaus once a year.

Consolidate accounts and simplify your financial life

If you’ve accumulated many bank, investment and other financial accounts over the years, you might consider consolidating some of them. Having multiple accounts requires you to spend more time tracking and reconciling financial activities and can make it harder to keep a handle on how much you have and whether your money is being invested advantageously.

Start by identifying the accounts that offer you the best combination of excellent customer service, convenience, lower fees and higher returns. Hold on to these and consider closing the rest, keeping in mind the bank account amounts you’ll be consolidating. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation generally insures $250,000 per depositor, per insured bank. So if consolidation means that your balance might exceed that amount, it’s better to keep multiple accounts. You should also keep accounts with different beneficiaries separate.

When closing accounts, make sure you stop automatic payments or deposits and destroy checks and cards associated with them. To prevent any future disputes, obtain letters from the financial institutions stating that your accounts have been closed. Closing an account generally takes several weeks.

 

2015 Year End Tax Planning

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 17 2015

 

As 2015 draws to a close, there is still time to reduce your 2015 tax bill and plan ahead for 2016. This letter highlights several potential tax-saving opportunities for you to consider. I would be happy to meet with you to discuss specific strategies.

 

 

 

As a general reminder, there are several ways in which you can file an income tax return: married filing jointly, head of household, single, and married filing separately. A married couple, which includes same-sex marriages, may elect to file one return reporting their combined income, computing the tax liability using the tax tables or rate schedules for “Married Persons Filing Jointly.” If a married couple files separate returns, in certain situations they can amend and file jointly, but they cannot amend a jointly filed return and file separately. A joint return may be filed even though one spouse has neither gross income nor deductions. If one spouse dies during the year, the surviving spouse may file a joint return for the year in which his or her spouse died. Certain married persons who do not elect to file a joint return may be entitled to use the lower head of household tax rates. Generally, in order to qualify as a head of household, you must not be a resident alien, you must satisfy certain marital status requirements, and you must maintain a household for a qualifying child or any other person who is your dependent, if you are entitled to a dependency deduction for the taxable year for such person.

 

 

 

Basic Numbers You Need to Know

 

Because many tax benefits are tied to or limited by adjusted gross income (AGI)—IRA deductions, for example—a key aspect of tax planning is to estimate both your 2015 and 2016 AGI. Your 2014 tax return and your 2015 pay stubs and other income- and deduction-related materials are a good starting point for estimating your AGI.

 

Another important number is your “tax bracket,” i.e., the rate at which your last dollar of income is taxed. The tax rates for 2015 have not changed from 2014 and are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35% and 39.6%. Although tax brackets are indexed for inflation, if your income increases faster than the inflation adjustment, you may be pushed into a higher bracket. If so, your potential benefit from any tax-saving opportunity is increased (as is the cost of overlooking that opportunity).

 

 

 

Gift Giving

 

Annual Gift Tax Exclusion: The most commonly used method for tax-free giving is the annual gift tax exclusion, which, for 2015, allows a person to give up to $14,000 to each donee without reducing the giver's estate and lifetime gift tax exclusion amount. A person is not limited as to the number of donees to whom he or she may make such gifts. Further, because the annual exclusion is applied on a per-donee basis, a person can leverage the exclusion by making gifts to multiple donees (family and non-family). Thus, if an individual makes $14,000 gifts to 10 donees, he or she may exclude $140,000 from tax. In addition, because spouses may combine their exclusions in a single gift from either spouse, married givers may double the amount of the exclusion to $28,000 per donee. A person may not carry over his or her annual gift tax exclusion amount to the next calendar year. Qualifying tuition payments and medical payments do not count against this limit.

 

 

 

IRA, Retirement Savings Rules

 

Tax-saving opportunities continue for retirement planning due to the availability of Roth IRAs, changes that make regular IRAs more attractive, and other retirement savings incentives.

 

Traditional IRAs: Individuals who are not active participants in an employer pension plan may make deductible contributions to an IRA. The annual deductible contribution limit for an IRA for 2015 is $5,500. For 2015, a $1,000 “catch-up” contribution is allowed for taxpayers age 50 or older by the close of the taxable year, making the total limit $6,500 for these individuals. Individuals who are active participants in an employer pension plan also may make deductible contributions to an IRA, but their contributions are limited in amount depending on their AGI.

 

 

 

IRA Rollovers: As of 2015, taxpayers may make only one IRA-to-IRA rollover per year. (Direct rollovers from trustee to trustee are not affected.) An attempted rollover after the first will be treated as a withdrawal and taxed at regular rates, plus a possible 10% early withdrawal penalty.

 

Spousal IRA: If an individual files a joint return and has less compensation than his or her spouse, the IRA contribution is limited to the lesser of $5,500 for 2015 plus age 50 catch-up contributions ($1,000 for 2015), or the total compensation of both spouses reduced by the other spouse's IRA contributions (traditional and Roth).

 

Roth IRA: This type of IRA permits nondeductible contributions of up to $5,500 for 2015, but no more than an individual's compensation. Earnings grow tax-free, and distributions are tax-free provided no distributions are made until more than five years after the first contribution and the individual has reached age 591/2.

 

Roth IRA Conversion Rule: Funds in a traditional IRA (including SEPs and SIMPLE IRAs), §401(a) qualified retirement plan, §403(b) tax-sheltered annuity or §457 government plan may be rolled over into a Roth IRA. Such a rollover, however, is treated as a taxable event, and you will pay tax on the amount converted. No penalties will apply if all the requirements for such a transfer are satisfied.

 

401(k) Contribution: The §401(k) elective deferral limit is $18,000 for 2015. If your §401(k) plan has been amended to allow for catch-up contributions for 2015 and you will be 50 years old by December 31, 2015, you may contribute an additional $6,000 to your §401(k) account, for a total maximum contribution of $24,000.

 

SIMPLE Plan Contribution: The SIMPLE plan deferral limit is $12,500 for 2015. If your SIMPLE plan has been amended to allow for catch-up contributions for 2015 and you will be 50 years old by December 31, 2015, you may contribute an additional $3,000.

 

Catch-Up Contributions for Other Plans: If you will be 50 years old by December 31, 2015, you may contribute an additional $6,000 to your §403(b) plan, SEP or eligible §457 government plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Maximize Retirement Savings: In many cases, employers will require you to set your 2016 retirement contribution levels before January 2016. If you did not elect the maximum 401(k) contribution for 2015, you can increase your amount for the remainder of 2015 to lower your AGI in order to take advantage of some of the tax breaks described above. In addition, maximizing your contribution is generally a good tax-saving move.

 

 

 

Deferring Income to 2016

 

If you expect your AGI to be higher in 2015 than in 2016, or if you anticipate being in the same or a higher tax bracket in 2015, you may benefit by deferring income to 2016. Deferring income will be advantageous so long as the deferral does not bump your income to the next bracket.

 

Interest and Dividends: Interest income earned on Treasury securities and bank certificates of deposit with maturities of one year or less is not includible in income until received. To defer interest income, consider buying short-term bonds or certificates that will not mature until next year. If you have control as to when dividends are paid, arrange to have them paid to you after the end of the year.

 

 

 

Deduction Planning

 

Individual Deductions

 

Deduction timing is also an important element of year-end tax planning. Deduction planning is complex, however, due to factors such as AGI levels, AMT, and filing status. If you are a cash-method taxpayer, remember to keep the following in mind:

 

Deduction in Year Paid: An expense is only deductible in the year in which it is actually paid. Under this rule, if your tax rate is going to increase in 2016, it is a smart strategy to postpone deductions until 2016.

 

Payment by Check: Date checks before the end of the year and mail them before January 1, 2016.

 

Standard Deduction Planning: Deduction planning is also affected by the standard deduction. For 2015 returns, the standard deduction is $12,600 for married taxpayers filing jointly, $6,300 for single taxpayers, $9,250 for heads of households, and $6,300 for married taxpayers filing separately. As you can see from the numbers, for 2015, the standard deduction for married taxpayers is twice the amount as that for single taxpayers. If your itemized deductions are relatively constant and are close to the standard deduction amount, you will obtain little or no benefit from itemizing your deductions each year. But simply taking the standard deduction each year means you lose the benefit of your itemized deductions. To maximize the benefits of both the standard deduction and itemized deductions, consider adjusting the timing of your deductible expenses so that they are higher in one year and lower in the following year. You can do this by paying in 2015 deductible expenses, such as mortgage interest due in January 2016.

 

Medical Expenses: For 2015, medical expenses, including amounts paid as health insurance premiums, are deductible only to the extent that they exceed 10% of AGI (7.5% for taxpayers age 65 or older through 2016).

 

State Taxes: If you anticipate a state income tax liability for 2015 and plan to make an estimated payment most likely due in January, consider making the payment before the end of 2015. However, too high a payment could lead towards being subject to the AMT. Note that the election to deduct as an itemized deduction state and local sales taxes instead of state and local income taxes expired at the end of 2014 and unless Congress acts before the end of 2015 to reinstate the benefit, it will not be available on your 2015 tax return.

 

Charitable Contributions: Consider making your charitable contributions at the end of the year. This will give you use of the money during the year and simultaneously permit you to claim a deduction for that year. You can use a credit card to charge donations in 2015 even though you will not pay the bill until 2016. A mere pledge to make a donation is not deductible, however, unless it is paid by the end of the year. Note, however, for claimed donations of cars, boats and airplanes of more than $500, the amount available as a deduction will significantly depend on what the charity does with the donated property, not just the fair market value of the donated property. To avoid capital gains, you may want to consider giving appreciated property to charity.

 

Regarding charitable contributions please remember the following rules: (1) no deduction is allowed for charitable contributions of clothing and household items if such items are not in good used condition or better; (2) the IRS may deny a deduction for any item with minimal monetary value; and (3) the restrictions in (1) and (2) do not apply to the contribution of any single clothing or household item for which a deduction of $500 or more is claimed if the taxpayer includes a qualified appraisal with his or her return. Charitable contributions of money, regardless of the amount, will be denied a deduction, unless the donor maintains a cancelled check, bank record, or receipt from the donee organization showing the name of the donee organization, and the date and amount of the contribution.

 

A special provision gives taxpayers the ability to distribute tax-free to charity up to $100,000 from a traditional or Roth IRA maintained for an individual who has reached age 701/2. Note that this provision expired at the end of 2014 and unless Congress acts before the end of 2015 to reinstate the benefit, it will not be available on your 2015 tax return.

 

 

 

Business Deductions

 

Equipment Purchases: If you are in business and purchase equipment, you may make a “Section 179 Election,” which allows you to expense (i.e., currently deduct) otherwise depreciable business property. For 2015, the allowable deduction is limited to $25,000 (much lower than in previous years). Note that if Congress acts before the end of the year to reinstate the higher deductible amounts, it will be to your advantage to expense more equipment.

 

NOL Carryback Period: If your business suffers net operating losses for 2015, you generally apply those losses against taxable income going back two tax years. Thus, for example, the loss could be used to reduce taxable income—and thus generate tax refunds—for tax years as far back as 2013. Certain “eligible losses” can be carried back three years; farming losses can be carried back five years.

 

 

 

Education and Child Tax Benefits

 

Child Tax Credit: A tax credit of $1,000 per qualifying child under the age of 17 is available on this year's return. In order to qualify for 2015, the taxpayer must be allowed a dependency deduction for the qualifying child. Another qualifying determination is that the qualifying child must be younger than you. The credit is phased out at a rate of $50 for each $1,000 (or fraction of $1,000) of modified AGI exceeding the following amounts: $110,000 for married filing jointly; $55,000 for married filing separately; and $75,000 for all other taxpayers.

 

Education Credits: Back in 2009, significant changes were put in place for the Hope credit, including a name change to the American Opportunity Tax Credit. Due to legislation in early 2013, these changes continue through 2017. The maximum credit for 2015 is $2,500 (100% on the first $2,000, plus 25% of the next $2,000) for qualified tuition and fees paid on behalf of a student (i.e., the taxpayer, the taxpayer's spouse, or a dependent) who is enrolled on at least a half-time basis. The credit is available for the first four years of the student's post-secondary education. For 2015, the credit is phased out at modified AGI levels between $160,000 and $180,000 for joint filers, and between $80,000 and $90,000 for other taxpayers. Forty percent of the credit is refundable, which means that you can receive up to $1,000 even if you owe no taxes. One way to take advantage of the credit for 2015 is to prepay the spring 2016 tuition. In addition, if your child's books for the spring 2016 semester are known, those can be bought in 2015 and the costs qualify for the credit for 2015.

 

The Lifetime Learning credit maximum in 2015 is $2,000 (20% of qualified tuition and fees up to $10,000). A student need not be enrolled on at least a half-time basis so long as he or she is taking post-secondary classes to acquire or improve job skills. As with the Hope (American Opportunity Tax Credit in 2015) credit, eligible students include the taxpayer, the taxpayer's spouse, or a dependent. For 2015, the Lifetime Learning credit is phased out at modified AGI levels between $110,000 and $130,000 for joint filers, and between $55,000 and $65,000 for single taxpayers.

 

Student Loan Interest: You may be eligible for an above-the-line deduction for student loan interest paid on any “qualified education loan.” The maximum deduction is $2,500. The deduction for 2015 is phased out at a modified AGI level between $130,000 and $160,000 for joint filers, and between $65,000 and $80,000 for individual taxpayers.

 

Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Accounts: This is a new type of savings account for individuals with disabilities and their families. For 2015, taxpayers can contribute up to $14,000. Distributions are tax-free if used to pay the beneficiary's qualified disability expenses.

 

 

 

Energy Incentives

 

Residential Energy Efficient Property Credit: Until 2016, tax incentives are available to taxpayers who install certain energy efficient property, such as photovoltaic panels, solar water heating property, fuel cell property, small wind energy property and geothermal heat pumps. A credit is available for the expenditures incurred for such property up to a specific percentage, except that a cap applies for fuel cell property. The property purchased cannot be used to heat swimming pools or hot tubs. If you have made improvements to your home or plan to by the end of 2015, please contact me to discuss the amount of the credit you may qualify for.

 

 

 

Business Credits

 

Small Employer Pension Plan Startup Cost Credit: For 2015, certain small business employers that did not have a pension plan for the preceding three years may claim a nonrefundable income tax credit for expenses of establishing and administering a new retirement plan for employees. The credit applies to 50% in qualified administrative and retirement-education expenses for each of the first three plan years. However, the maximum credit is $500 per year.

 

Employer-Provided Child Care Credit: For 2015, employers may claim a credit of up to $150,000 for supporting employee child care or child care resource and referral services. The credit is allowed for a percentage of “qualified child care expenditures” including for property to be used as part of a qualified child care facility, for operating costs of a qualified child care facility and for resource and referral expenditures.

 

Work Opportunity Credit: The work opportunity credit is an incentive provided to employers who hire individuals in groups whose members historically have had difficulty obtaining employment. This gives your business an expanded opportunity to employ new workers and be eligible for a tax credit against the wages paid. The credit is determined based on first-year wages paid for employees hired on or before December 31, 2014. Thus, unless Congress acts to extend the credit into 2015, the benefit will not exist for workers hired in 2015.

 

 

 

Selling Your (Underwater) Home: If you are currently underwater on your home and you are considering selling or getting a loan modification, you might want to wait a little longer. Without extending legislation for 2015, qualified mortgage debt relief from your lender discharged in 2015 will be considered income and taxes will be owed on the amount forgiven.

 

Social Security: Depending on the recipient's modified AGI and the amount of Social Security benefits, a percentage — up to 85% — of Social Security benefits may be taxed. To reduce that percentage, it may be beneficial to defer receipt of other retirement income. One way to do so is to elect to receive a lump-sum distribution from a retirement plan and to rollover that distribution into an IRA. Alternatively, it may be beneficial to accelerate income so as to reduce the percentage of your Social Security taxed in 2016 and later years.

 

 

 

Other Tax Planning Opportunities: We also can discuss the potential benefits to you or your family members of other planning options available for 2015, including §529 qualified tuition programs.

 

 

 

Health Care Planning

 

Individual Mandate: Under the 2010 health care reform law, sometimes called Obamacare, in 2015, there is an individual mandate requiring individuals and their dependents to have health insurance that is minimum essential coverage or pay a penalty unless they are exempt from the requirement. Many people already have qualifying coverage, which can be obtained through the individual market, an employer-provided plan or coverage, a government program such as Medicare or Medicaid, or an Exchange. For lower-income individuals who obtain health insurance in the individual market through an Exchange, a premium tax credit and cost-sharing reductions may be available to offset the costs.

 

Health Care Savings Accounts: For 2015, cafeteria plans can provide that employees may elect no more than $2,550 in salary reduction contributions to a health FSA.

 

Self-Employed Health Insurance Premiums: Self-employed individuals are allowed to claim 100% of the amount paid during the taxable year for insurance that constitutes medical care for themselves, their spouses and dependents as an above-the-line deduction, without regard to the general 10% of AGI floor.

 

Health Savings Accounts: A health savings account (HSA) is a trust or custodial account exclusively created for the benefit of the account holder and his or her spouse and dependents, and is subject to rules similar to those applicable to individual retirement arrangements (IRAs). Contributions to an HSA are deductible, within limits

 

 

 

Alternative Minimum Tax

 

For 2015, the alternative minimum tax exemption amounts are: (1) $83,400 for married individuals filing jointly and for surviving spouses; (2) $53,600 for unmarried individuals other than surviving spouses; and (3) $41,700 for married individuals filing a separate return.

 

Penalties: The tax code imposes a host of penalties for failure to file returns with the IRS, failure to furnish information returns, and failure to pay tax. Beginning in 2015, the base amounts of some of the penalties are increased and, because of annual inflation adjustments, the cost of failure to properly report and pay tax will increase each year.

 

 

 

While we are getting very close to the end of the year, there is still time to implement these strategies to minimize your 2015 tax liability.

 

 

 

 

 

P 816.926.0900  F 816.926.9888   E pmreller@rellercpa.com
6247 Brookside Boulevard, Suite 201  Kansas City, Missouri 64113

 

PLEASE CONSIDER THE ENVIRONMENT BEFORE PRINTING THIS EMAIL.

 

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 17 2015

Tax Planning and Organizing & Combined Business and Vacation Travel

Posted by Admin Posted on July 02 2015

 

July 2015 Update - Tax Planning and Organizing & Combined Business and Vacation Travel

Summer time is a good time to start planning and organizing your taxes

You may be tempted to forget all about your taxes once you've filed your tax return, but that's not a good idea. If you start your tax planning now, you may avoid a tax surprise when you file next year. Also, now is a good time to set up a system so you can keep your tax records safe and easy to find. Here are some tips to give you a leg up on next year's taxes:

Take action when life changes occur. Some life events (such as marriage, divorce, or the birth of a child) can change the amount of tax you pay. When they happen, you may need to change the amount of tax withheld from your pay. To do that, file a new Form W-4 (“Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate”) with your employer. If you make estimated payments, those may need to be changed as well.

Keep records safe. Put your 2014 tax return and supporting records in a safe place. If you ever need your tax return or records, it will be easy for you to get them. You'll need your supporting documents if you are ever audited by the IRS. You may need a copy of your tax return if you apply for a home loan or financial aid.

Stay organized. Make tax time easier. Have your family put tax records in the same place during the year. That way you won't have to search for misplaced records when you file next year.

If you are self-employed, here are a couple of additional tax tips to consider:

Employ your child. Doing so shifts income (which is not subject to the “kiddie tax”) from you to your child, who normally is in a lower tax bracket or may avoid tax entirely due to the standard deduction. There can also be payroll tax savings; plus, the earnings can enable the child to contribute to an IRA. However, the wages paid must be reasonable given the child's age and work skills. Also, if the child is in college, or is entering soon, having too much earned income can have a detrimental impact on the student's need-based financial aid eligibility.

Avoid the hobby loss rules. A lot of businesses that are just starting out or have hit a bump in the road may wind up showing a loss for the year. The last thing the business owner wants in this situation is for the IRS to come knocking on the door arguing the business's losses aren't deductible because the activity is just a hobby for the owner. If your business is expecting a loss this year, we should talk as soon as possible to make sure you do everything possible to maximize the tax benefit of the loss and minimize its economic impact.

Combined business and vacation travel

If you go on a business trip within the U.S. and add on some vacation days, you know you can deduct some of your expenses. The question is how much.

First, let’s cover just the pure transportation expenses. Transportation costs to and from the scene of your business activity are 100% deductible as long as the primary reason for the trip is business rather than pleasure. On the other hand, if vacation is the primary reason for your travel, then generally none of your transportation expenses are deductible. Transportation costs include travel to and from your departure airport, the airfare itself, baggage fees and tips, cabs, and so forth. Costs for rail travel or driving your personal car also fit into this category.

The number of days spent on business vs. pleasure is the key factor in determining if the primary reason for domestic travel is business. Your travel days count as business days, as do weekends and holidays if they fall between days devoted to business, and it would be impractical to return home. Standby days (days when your physical presence is required) also count as business days, even if you are not called upon to work on those days. Any other day principally devoted to business activities during normal business hours is also counted as a business day, and so are days when you intended to work, but could not due to reasons beyond your control (local transportation difficulties, power failure, etc.).

You should be able to claim business was the primary reason for a domestic trip whenever the business days exceed the personal days. Be sure to accumulate proof and keep it with your tax records. For example, if your trip is made to attend client meetings, log everything on your daily planner and copy the pages for your tax file. If you attend a convention or training seminar, keep the program and take some notes to show you attended the sessions.

Once at the destination, your out-of-pocket expenses for business days are fully deductible. Out-of-pocket expenses include lodging, hotel tips, meals (subject to the 50% disallowance rule), seminar and convention fees, and cab fare. Expenses for personal days are nondeductible.

Visit Our Website: www.rellercpa.com

 

Posted by Admin Posted on June 25 2015

ID Theft and Phone Scams on the Rise!

Posted by Admin Posted on June 25 2015

 

The IRS has seen a recent increase in local phone scams across the country, with callers pretending to be from the IRS in hopes of stealing money or identities from victims.

 

These phone scams include many variations, ranging from instances from where callers say the victims owe money or are entitled to a huge refund. Some calls can threaten arrest and threaten a driver’s license revocation. Sometimes these calls are paired with follow-up calls from people saying they are from the local police department or the state motor vehicle department.

 

Characteristics of these scams can include:

 

  • Scammers use fake names and IRS badge numbers. They generally use common names and surnames to identify themselves.

  • Scammers may be able to recite the last four digits of a victim’s Social Security Number.

  • Scammers “spoof” or imitate the IRS toll-free number on caller ID to make it appear that it’s the IRS calling.

  • Scammers sometimes send bogus IRS emails to some victims to support their bogus calls.

  • Victims hear background noise of other calls being conducted to mimic a call site.

 

After threatening victims with jail time or a driver’s license revocation, scammers hang up and others soon call back pretending to be from the local police or DMV, and the caller ID supports their claim.

 

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS, here’s what you should do: If you know you owe taxes or you think you might owe taxes, call the IRS at 800-829-1040. The IRS employees at that line can help you with a payment issue – if there really is such an issue.

 

If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to think that you owe any taxes (for example, you’ve never received a bill or the caller made some bogus threats as described above), then call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 800-366-4484.

 

If you’ve been targeted by these scams, you should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov.  Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments of your complaint.                                                     

 

  • Identity Theft

 

Tax fraud through the use of identity theft is increasing. Identity theft occurs when someone uses your personal information, such as your name, Social Security number (SSN) or other identifying information, without your permission, to commit fraud or other crimes. In many cases, an identity thief uses a legitimate taxpayer’s identity to fraudulently file a tax return and claim a refund.

 

The IRS has a special section on IRS.gov dedicated to identity theft issues, including YouTube videos, tips for taxpayers and an assistance guide. For victims, the information includes how to contact the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit. For other taxpayers, there are tips on how taxpayers can protect themselves against identity theft.

 

Taxpayers who believe they are at risk of identity theft due to lost or stolen personal information should contact the IRS immediately so the agency can take action to secure their tax account. Taxpayers can call the IRS Identity Protection Specialized Unit at 800-908-4490. More information can be found on the special identity protection page.

 

 

 

Reller & Company attended a CyberSecurity Seminar put on by MO Bank last week.  Here are a couple take notes from that seminar:

 

1.     Avoid clicking links embedded in emails.  

 

2.     Don’t trust any WiFi

 

3.     Don’t login to email, bank accounts or shopping websites on FREE WiFi

 

4.     Keep your computer, software patches and antivirus up to date.

 

 

 

And finally, pull a credit report on yourself, spouse and children to protect yourself and be proactive.  As always, please contact our office if you have questions or concerns.

 

 

 

Reller CPA Blog

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 11 2013

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